Note: This is a continuation in a series on media relations. To start from the beginning, go here


Whenever you speak with the media you have to know exactly what you are going to say, how you are going to say it, and when to not say any more.

So how do you decide?

Let’s take stock of what we know. Let’s think back to our first call to the reporter. We know, based on that conversation, what the reporter wants, and what angle they will take.

When you speak with a reporter who is going to quote you, always have a piece of paper with your key points on it. If it is a TV news story, memorize the points.

How do you create the points?

Think for a moment about the three things what you want community members to understand after having read your quote or heard your comment. What messages do you to convey?

Whatever those messages are, write them on a piece of paper as 1,2 and 3. Then, under each number, write A, B, and C. The result will be three numbers and nine letters.

Now, think of the three general ideas you want to convey. Write these next to 1, 2 and 3.

Now, under each letter item, write three supporting facts as A, B, and C.

There, you created talking points for your interview. It’s that simple…

Tune in tomorrow for the next post in this series.